WHAT EVEN
go away
——————————————— Suddenly, with a strained sound, she bent her head into the shirts and began to cry stormily.

“They’re such beautiful shirts,” she sobbed, her voice muffled in the thick folds. “It makes me sad because I’ve never seen such — such beautiful shirts before.” ———————————————
andpancakeschristiandinoor
"I was half in love with her by the time we sat down. That’s the thing about girls. Every time they do something pretty, even if they’re not much to look at, or even if they’re sort of stupid, you fall half in love with them, and then you never know where the hell you are. Girls. Jesus Christ. They can drive you crazy. They really can."

- J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye (via xtndnr)

12/27 11:04 - christiandinoor - 8,362 notes

ON SEEING THE 100% PERFECT GIRL ONE BEAUTIFUL APRIL MORNING

by Haruki Murakami

We pass in front of a flower shop. A small, warm air mass touches my skin. The asphalt is damp, and I catch the scent of roses. I can’t bring myself to speak to her. She wears a white sweater, and in her right hand she holds a crisp white envelope lacking only a stamp. So: She’s written somebody a letter, maybe spent the whole night writing, to judge from the sleepy look in her eyes. The envelope could contain evey secret she’s ever had.

I take a few more strides and turn: She’s lost in the crowd.

Now, of course, I know exactly what I should have said to her. It would have been a long speech, though, far too long for me to have delivered it properly. The ideas I come up with are never very practical.

Oh, well. It would have started ”Once upon a time” and ended ”A sad story, don’t you think?”

Once upon a time, there lived a boy and a girl. The boy was eighteen and the girl sixteen. He was not unusually handsome, and she was not especially beautiful. They were just an ordinary lonely boy and an ordinary lonely girl, like all the others. But they believed with their whole hearts that somewhere in the world there lived the 100% perfect boy and the 100% perfect girl for them. Yes, they believed in a miracle. And that miracle actually happened.

One day the two came upon each other on the corner of a street.

”This is amazing,” he said. ”I’ve been looking for you all my life. You may not believe this, but you’re the 100% perfect girl for me.”

”And you,” she said to him, ”are the 100% perfect boy for me, exactly as I’d pictured you in every detail. It’s like a dream.”

They sat on a park bench, held hands, and told each other their stories hour after hour. They were not lonely anymore. They have found and been found by their 100% perfect other. What a wonderful thing it is to find and be found by your 100% perfect other. It’s a miracle, a cosmic miracle.

As they sat and talked, however, a tiny, tiny silver of doubt took root in their hearts: Was it really all right for one’s dreams to come true so easily? And so, when there came a momentary lull in their conversation, the boy said to the girl, ”Let’s test ourselves - just once. If we really are each other’s 100% perfect lovers, then somtime, somewhere, we will meet again without fail. And when that happens, and we know that we are the 100% perfect ones, we’ll marry than and there. What do you think?”

”Yes,” she said, ”that is exactly what we should do.”

And so they parted, she to the east, and he to the west.

The test they had agreed upon, however, wast utterly unnecessary. They should never have undertaken it, because they really and truly were each other’s 100% perfect lovers, and it was a miracle that they had ever met. But it was impossible for them to know this, young as they were. The cold, indifferent waves of fate proceeded to toss them unmercifully.

One winter, both boy and the girl came down with the season’s terrible inluenza, and after drifting for weeks between life and death they lost all memory of their earlier years. When they awoke, their heads were empty as the young D. H. Lawrence’s piggy bank.

They were two bright, determined young people, however, and through their unremitting efforts they were able to acquire once again the knowlege and feeling that qualified them to return as full-fledged members of society. Heaven be praised, they became truly upstanding citizens who knew how to transfer from one subway line to another, who were fully capable of sending a special-delivery letter at the post office. Indeed, they even experienced love again, sometimes as much as 75% or even 85% love. 

Time passed with shocking swiftness, and soon the boy was thirty-two, the girl thirty.

One beautiful April morning, in search of a cup of coffe to start the day, the boy was walking from west to east, while girl, intending to send a special-delivery letter, was walking from east to west, but along the same narrow street in the Hajaruku neighborhood of Tokyo. They passed each other in the very center of the street. The faintest gleam of their lost memoires glimmered for the briefest moment in their hearts. Each felt a rumbling in their chest. And they knew: 

She is the 100% perfect girl for me.

He is the 100% perfect boy for me.

But the glow of their memories was far too weak, and their thoughts no longer had clarity of fourteen years earlier. Without a word, they passed each other, disappearing into the crowd. Forever.

A sad story, don’t you think?                                                          

Yes, that’s it, that is what I should have said to her.

4/8 13:40 - 10 notes
kbass2112neuronstarcollision
"You’ll meet her. She’s very pretty, even though sometimes she’s sad for many days at a time. You’ll see, when she smiles, you’ll love her."

- Pan’s Labyrinth (via snuffaluffogus)

3/13 17:05 - neuronstarcollision - 228,783 notes
youmightfindyourself

John Steinbeck on Falling in Love: A 1958 Letter to his eldest son →

youmightfindyourself:

New York
November 10, 1958

Dear Thom:

We had your letter this morning. I will answer it from my point of view and of course Elaine will from hers.

First — if you are in love — that’s a good thing — that’s about the best thing that can happen to anyone. Don’t let anyone make it small or light to you.

Second — There are several kinds of love. One is a selfish, mean, grasping, egotistical thing which uses love for self-importance. This is the ugly and crippling kind. The other is an outpouring of everything good in you — of kindness and consideration and respect — not only the social respect of manners but the greater respect which is recognition of another person as unique and valuable. The first kind can make you sick and small and weak but the second can release in you strength, and courage and goodness and even wisdom you didn’t know you had.

You say this is not puppy love. If you feel so deeply — of course it isn’t puppy love.

But I don’t think you were asking me what you feel. You know better than anyone. What you wanted me to help you with is what to do about it — and that I can tell you.

Glory in it for one thing and be very glad and grateful for it.

The object of love is the best and most beautiful. Try to live up to it.

If you love someone — there is no possible harm in saying so — only you must remember that some people are very shy and sometimes the saying must take that shyness into consideration.

Girls have a way of knowing or feeling what you feel, but they usually like to hear it also.

It sometimes happens that what you feel is not returned for one reason or another — but that does not make your feeling less valuable and good.

Lastly, I know your feeling because I have it and I’m glad you have it.

We will be glad to meet Susan. She will be very welcome. But Elaine will make all such arrangements because that is her province and she will be very glad to. She knows about love too and maybe she can give you more help than I can.

And don’t worry about losing. If it is right, it happens — The main thing is not to hurry. Nothing good gets away.

Love,

Fa

cooperfredericksonslightlypretentious

Weltschmerz - →

cooperfrederickson:

1: mental depression or apathy caused by comparison of the actual state of the world with an ideal state

2: Story of my life

the-feature

Art of the Steal: On the Trail of World’s Most Ingenious Thief →

“Cunning, clever, conniving, and creative,” as one prosecutor would call him, Blanchard eluded the police for years. But eventually he made a mistake. And that mistake would take two officers from the modest police force of Winnipeg, Canada, on a wild ride of high tech capers across Africa, Canada, and Europe. Says Mitch McCormick, one of those Winnipeg investigators, “We had never seen anything like it.”

1/20 00:38 - the-feature - 32 notes
teacupsandtaxidermyestherglassphife
"Nothing makes people more neurotic than the expectation that they should be enjoying themselves."

- The Economist  (via lizzzrd)

thechocolatebrigadeslightlypretentious
"

Famous loners and anti-socialites make me feel happy. Why is being a loner characterized as a ‘social disorder’? It makes me never want to speak to anyone again. It makes me annoyed to be labeled as ‘antisocial’ or socially anxious.

I feel like if you don’t get on really well with someone, there is little point in spending time socialising with them. Most events are full of people talking about nothing and this makes me feel even worse than staying at home, alone. Or perhaps I am just jealous of the people talking about nothing and can’t step out of this godforesaken bubble that makes me want to never go out again.

Some people need time alone to process thoughts and events and some people don’t. I will probably always be this way. I wish people wouldn’t make introversion into a personality flaw.

"

- Marina Diamandis  (via avantgardess)

"It’s these cards and the movies and the pop songs, they’re to blame for all the lies and the heartache, everything."

- the lonely sad guy from 500 days of summer

1/2 23:05 - 4 notes
saddest-summerarbusfinch-deactivated20140115
"The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts, while the stupid ones are full of confidence."

- Charles Bukowski (via saddest-summer)